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EU proposes minimum of 8 million EV charging points by 2020

28 January 2013

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On 24 January 2013, the European Commission unveiled measures to boost the deployment of alternative fuels, including electricity and hydrogen, in EU transport. Under the ‘Clean Power for Transport’ package, the Commission proposes minimum number of recharging points per country with common standards for interoperability throughout the EU.
Even though alternative fuels, such as electricity and hydrogen are available in the market, there are several obstacles that prevent their wider deployment. According to the European Commission, the major hurdle is the lack of charging infrastructure with a common plug to facilitate the interoperability. With the ‘Clean Power for Fuel Transport’, the Commission aims to break the vicious circle between the lack of infrastructure and the shortage of demand for alternative fuel vehicles.

Several alternative fuels, including electricity, hydrogen, LPG, natural gas and biofuels have been recognised as the main options for different transport modes.

Minimum charging points requirement

Until today, the majority of Member States do not have sufficient number of publicly accessible charging points and have not set any targets or announced strategies to roll out an adequate network of recharging facilities. The existing charging infrastructure varies greatly across the EU, with Germany, France, the Netherlands, Spain, Austria and the UK ahead of other Member States.

To address this hurdle and to put in place a critical mass of charging stations to boost the deployment of EVs, the European Commission proposes minimum number of charging points per country that shall be put in place by 2020 at the latest. Moreover, the proposal requires that at least 10% of the recharging points be publicly available. The total estimated cost for the proposed development of electric charging points in the EU will be approximately € 8 billion.


Members States

Existing infrastructure

(charging points)

2011

Proposed targets of recharging points by 2020

Proposed targets of publicly accessible infrastructure by 2020

Member States' plans for nos of electric vehicles for 2020

Austria

489

116,000

12,000

250,000

Belgium

188

207,000

21,000

-

Bulgaria

1

69,000

7,000

-

Cyprus

-

20,000

2,000

-

Czech Republic

23

129,000

13,000

-

Germany

1,937

1,503,000

150,000

1,000,000

Denmark

280

54,000

5,000

200,000

Estonia

2

12,000

1,000

-

Greece

3

128,000

13,000

-

Finland

1

71,000

7,000

-

France

1,600

969,000

97,000

2,000,000

Hungary

7

68,000

7,000

-

Ireland

640

22,000

2,000

350,000

Italy

1,350

1,255,000

125,000

130,000 (by 2015)

Lithuania

-

41,000

4,000

-

Luxembourg

7

14,000

1,000

40,000

Latvia

1

17,000

2,000

-

Malta

-

10,000

1,000

-

Netherlands

1,700

321,000

32,000

200,000

Poland

27

460,000

46,000

-

Portugal

1,350

123,000

12,000

200,000

Romania

1

101,000

10,000

-

Spain

1,356

824,000

82,000

2,500,000

Slovakia

3

36,000

4,000

-

Slovenia

80

26,000

3,000

14,000

Sweden

-

145,000

14,000

600,000

United Kingdom

703

1,221,000

122,000

1,550,000



Common standard for charging points

To ensure the interoperability of the charging infrastructure across the EU, the proposal aims to ensure that a common standard be adopted. For normal charging the Type 2 connectors described in standard EN62196-2:2012 shall be implemented by end of 2015.

As for fast charging, the following standards shall apply by end of 2017:
  • AC (alternate current) shall be equipped with Type 2 connectors as described in standard EN62196-2:2012
  • DC (direct current) shall be equipped with ‘Combo2’ connectors as described in the relevant EN standard, to be adopted by 2014

National plans

Under the ‘Clean Power for Transport’ package, each Member State will have to adopt national policy framework for the development of alternative fuels and their infrastructure, which shall contain the following elements:
  • Assessment of the state and future development of alternative fuels
  • Regulatory framework to support the build-up of infrastructure for alternative fuels
  • Direct incentives for the purchase of alternative fuel vehicles or building of the infrastructure
  • Possibility of tax incentives to promote alternative fuels
  • Non-financial incentives
  • Public budget allocated for alternative fuels infrastructure deployment, to support manufacturing plants for alternative fuels technologies and to support research and development
  • Yearly national targets as well as targets by 2020 for the deployment of alternative fuels.




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